Suicide prevention month: How 3 organizations have turned personal loss into suicide prevention efforts

Frank discussions about mental health issues and concerns across America have become far more common these days, yet suicide continues to be the second leading cause of death among our nation’s youth.

And while plenty of organizations in the U.S. aim to prevent the tragedy of suicide, several have been founded specifically by those who have been touched profoundly within their own inner circles by the loss of loved ones to suicide.

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Here’s a close look at three of those organizations, how and why they were founded — and what they’re doing specifically as they work to prevent suicide today to the very best of their ability.

The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide (SPTS), based in N.J., was begun in 2005 by two dads from Freehold, Scott Fritz and Don Quigley.

Tragically, they each lost their teenage children to suicide within a couple of months of each other.

SPTS clinical director Susan Tellone told Fox News Digital in an interview that the founders — who didn’t know anyone else who’d lost children to suicide at that point — decided to band together at a time when the issue was “quite prevalent.”

Since educational resources were slim, SPTS was one of the first organizations to advocate for mandatory suicide education in schools in New Jersey — which has since been adopted nationwide, Tellone explained.

“We teach how schools should manage any traumatic loss [and] how