On this day in history, Oct. 19, 1789, John Jay sworn in as first Supreme Court chief justice

Founding Father John Jay, a towering figure among the intellectual giants who forged the nation, was sworn in as first chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on this day in history, Oct. 19, 1789.

The New York native held the title until resigning in 1795, among the shortest tenures for the prestigious lifetime appointment.

Only 16 other people have held the title of Supreme Court chief justice in the 227 years since.

Leading the high court in its infancy was one of many incredible achievements by this Founding Father, a man whose contributions to the nation’s creation have been overshadowed through the years by several of his contemporaries.

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“John Jay filled more high offices than any other Founding Father, including president of the Second Continental Congress, secretary of foreign affairs under the Articles of Confederation, and, most famously, the Supreme Court’s first chief justice,” wrote the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in its praise of the foundational figure in American history.

“Washington saw Jay as unique in his superior virtue and objectivity and appointed him chief justice with great confidence in his qualifications,” added the National Portrait Gallery tribute.

“John Jay filled more high offices than any other Founding Father.”

President George Washington nominated Jay to the chief justice position on Sept.